Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control.

This is considered a basic right, something that New Zealand has signed its agreement to. We have the right to a decent standard of living, and the right to social security. So what’s going on with our government?

We have a right to adequate food – so why do we have to fight for food grants, and why are various  benefits not actually enough to feed their recipients on? Budgeting services across the country are sending their clients to food banks week after week because the clients have budgeted their money well and responsibly, and still there’s not enough to buy adequate food.

We have a right to adequate clothing – but there are kids all over the country who are being given socks, shoes, and jackets by KidsCan because their parents cannot afford these things.

We have the right to adequate housing, but our government refused to take up a bill proposing a warrant of fitness for rental homes so poor people in cheap accommodation are not living in places unfit for habitation. Our government is also selling off our stocks of social housing, ostensibly to social housing providers, but actually more likely into the hands of investors wanting to make a profit from them.

We have the right to adequate medical care, but our healthcare system is struggling under the weight of increasing need coupled with a static budget. Things that are nice to have are just off the list, and things that are utterly essential are pared back. Elective surgery lists are so long that by law most people are not officially on the list, because the list can only be six months long.

We have the right to necessary social services, but CYFS is so underfunded that it has had to cut back on necessary social welfare checks on foster children. The education budget is static, meaning that the education of our children is being slowly eroded, while teachers shudder under the weight of paperwork that they are forced to complete. Homeless shelters subsidised by the government are fully booked out, forced to deal with newly released prisoners and those fresh from mental health inpatient units, for which they are unequipped.

We have the right to security in case of lack of livelihood through circumstances beyond our control. Yet the government takes a punitive approach to beneficiaries, cutting benefits for minor sins, things that shouldn’t even be considered wrongdoing, like not applying for enough jobs in a week. Single parents are particularly victimised, with further restrictions on their parenting choices appearing with every new iteration of social development policy. The sick and disabled, distinctly named here as deserving of social security, are pushed toward work that they are in many cases not able to do effectively or safely, rather than being supported.

The current government is punitive, punishing people for being poor, being unemployed, being a solo parent, being ill. It’s not fair, and it’s directly against an international declaration that we have signed. Those things don’t really mean anything, it seems, unless we’re judging another nation for not following them.

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