Cold damp housing kills

A couple of days ago, I wrote about the death of Emma-Lita Bourne, who passed away from complications of pneumonia. Her cold, damp home was ruled to be a factor in her death. Today, news broke of the death of Soesa Tovo, a 37-year-old man from South Auckland, who died after a year of medical requests for the family to be moved from their cold and damp home He struggled with heart and lung issues, including a hospitalisation for bilateral pneumonia.

Over and over again, social workers associated with various health care organisations including the hospital that treated him for pneumonia and his local Primary Healthcare Organisation, wrote to Housing New Zealand to request that he, his wife, and their six children be moved. Their three-bedroom home was damp, mouldy, and so cold that the whole family slept in the lounge together – the only room in the house with carpet. The ceiling was insulated, but that was not nearly enough to make it a warm dry home.

Housing New Zealand homes are killing people. Many are in locations already known for being cold and damp anyway, and the houses need extra care to keep out the moisture and mould. But the government hasn’t been maintaining the houses, and they’re falling into disrepair. That sounds quite sterile – ‘disrepair’ – but it’s murderous. It’s literally killing people.

The school noticed the kids were sick all the time. The father was in and out of hospital. Yet Housing New Zealand did nothing at all to help this family. You can talk all you like about waiting lists and fairness and appreciating what you have, but I want to know why there was a family living in a home unfit for human habitation. They won’t be the only ones, either. We just don’t hear about the others until someone dies.

State housing was originally built to give workers strong, healthy homes so that they could be at their most productive. Today they’re storehouses of misery. We can do better! What we lack is the will to do better. This government gives precisely zero shits about the welfare of its poor people.

The kicker for the Tovo family is that, almost a year after Soesa died, they are still in that same small damp dump. Even the struggle of grief, added on to the list of illness and misery already catalogued, was not enough to get that family a better home.

What does it take to get help around here?

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